The Frog Toss

You know, my husband and I said, way back when, we did this for our kids.  They were little back then.  Like, really little.  They wouldn’t sit through a Passover Seder, the long, tedious amounts of reading, praying, and singing I’d been subjected to as a kid.  I remember feeling that night to be endless, even if I had the coveted spot of sitting in between my mom and my dad.

And don’t get me wrong.  My dad was quite the show man, and Pessach was no exception.  No one could sing Dayenu faster than him.  No one could storytell like he could.  Glasses of wine stopped being counted, heck, in fact, we had a huge plastic bin filled to the rim with homemade Sangria providing a constant flow for those longing to remain sweetly and happily inebriated.

But there was still tradition.  My father was still, after all, the son of Itzaak Abbady.  And even though I never met my grandfather, I knew he was a hard core traditionalist.  I’d heard from my dad, the rebel and adventurer of the family, as he sizzled up bacon on Saturday mornings in our Venezuelan home.

“Your saba would turn in his grave,” he say with mischief in his eye, nodding towards the pan as he flipped over a piece of bacon.  I never knew if he was serious or not.  I grew up on a steady diet of Jewish law rule-breaking, but, when it came to Passover, the Haggadah was pulled out and read from front to end.

 

I was always starving throughout it all.  Matzoh, I tell you, isn’t much of an appetite repellent.

 

So when my husband and I found ourselves in the role of hosting the Seder, we turned to The Rugrats, our 2-year old’s favorite cartoon show.  They, apparently, covered the whole thing in 32 bright and funny picture book pages.

 

That first Seder was a huge success.  We cut up an ocean-themed shower curtain, nailed it over the front door, and announced everyone would cross the Red Sea.  Craft paper covered our front entrance, paint brushes were handed out, and instructions shouted: “Here!  Paint!  Mark the house so God will pass over us!”

 

When we read about the 10 plagues, toy frogs and wild animals whirled across the table at each other, making sure Eliyahu’s cup didn’t get knocked over.

So, here’s the secret:

If you include a shower curtain, red paint, and toys in your Passover Seder, people pay attention, people come back.

The funny thing is that, as you have also figured, kids grow up.  From babies to teens, ours, and everyone else’s grew in front of Eliyahu.   But the Rugrats still reigned during Passover Seder.  The Rugrats, actually, are still in high demand.

This year my daughter will graduate from high school, but in between making her list for what she will need for college and figuring out what classes she will take once there, she is still a killer frog thrower.  Knows how to zonk one right on her dad’s forehead.

Those things hurt, you know.

They are small and plastic and surprisingly pick up speed, efficiently bypassing plates of chariest and half a rosemary-infused lamb.  My husband may flinch at first impact, but he does what makes this night even more special, he laughs, and immediately throws one right back.

That’s all you can do.  It’s a war zone of flying plastic frogs at our Seder.  Attack or be attacked.

We keep a fresh supply of plastic frogs handy. Next year they’ll all come back again.

 


Rosemary-infused lamb

Ingredients

  • 1/2 a lamb (leg, ribs, and shoulder)
  • 10-12 garlic cloves, slivered
  • 6 tablespoons rosemary (preferably fresh)
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Have your butcher divide the lamb up for you.
  2. Insert tiny slivers with a sharp knife throughout the lamb.
  3. Stuff a sliver of garlic in each one.
  4. Coat the lamb with remaining ingredients.
  5. Place in the oven for 1 hour (for rare).
  6. Remove and let sit for 20 minutes before carving.
  7. Serves 15
http://culinarycompulsion.com/2017/04/the-frog-toss/

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